Eboracum Roman Festival – counting down to 1 June!

I know... no blog posts for ages, and then two in a row. But just in case anyone's missed the publicity so far... Eboracum Roman Festival is coming very soon, and it's going to be spectacular. There's a splendid programme of events for all ages, and much of the festival is freely open to the … Continue reading Eboracum Roman Festival – counting down to 1 June!

A grand day out with the Celts

How many people can you fit on a war chariot? What did the people Caesar called "Britons" call themselves? Since you've finished with that character in your story, can I kill him in mine? These are the kind of questions that  have been bandied about over the summer by the team putting together a collection … Continue reading A grand day out with the Celts

Life and Death in Pompeii and Herculaneum

I  love the British Museum more every time I visit. Pompeii and Herculaneum were destroyed by the same volcano AD 79, in but in different ways, so that different kinds of things survived in the buried wreckage. Now the British Museum has cleverly put items from the two together to give a vivid picture of … Continue reading Life and Death in Pompeii and Herculaneum

Now you see it… now you don’t. Now you see it.

I was deeply disappointed - outraged, actually - when the wonderful Roman cavalry helmet found at Crosby Garrett was auctioned a couple of years ago. Tullie House Museum, who would have put it on public display, couldn't outbid the offer of two million pounds made by a private buyer, and one of the most exciting … Continue reading Now you see it… now you don’t. Now you see it.

Death in Durham

Just back from a long weekend with friends in lovely Durham, where they seem to be having a festival of old bones. The archaeological museum  in the Old Fulling  Mill is currently running an exhibition of Skeleton Science, showing the sorts of investigations bioarchaeologists make into the remains that their non-bio colleagues dig up. The … Continue reading Death in Durham

To bury Jupiter, not to praise him

Regular readers may remember that we've been to Maryport a couple of times before on this blog: the first time mostly to admire a very battered old tombstone and the second time to report that more digging was scheduled for the fort. The excavators were hoping to find out more about the splendid altars to Jupiter on … Continue reading To bury Jupiter, not to praise him

Mostly armchair archaeology

Several technological goodies have popped up this week, so I thought I'd put them all together in one post. First - many thanks to Mark, who's sent a link to details of a smartphone app through which visitors can explore the sites and streets of Roman Londinium. (His original comment is under 'Welcome' above.) This one does … Continue reading Mostly armchair archaeology